News

“Wear Red for Ed” has lackluster showing at Hunter

The first of May was scheduled to be a day of unity for the faculty at Hunter College. In the spirit of May Day,brate workers, professors were asked to wear “Red for Ed.”  However this year’s showing was weak, and it was hard to spot any faculty members showing up to work in red.

May Day is an official holiday located in sixty-six countries, but it’s occasionally recognized in the United States, where it began. Dwight D. Eisenhower declared May 1 to be “Law Day” in 1958  to celebrate the place of law in the creation of the U.S. In addition the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions proclaimed that eight hour shifts shall constitute a legal day’s labor starting on May 1, 1886.

Around Hunter, it was hard to spot a member of the faculty in red. After walking through the hallways and the buildings several times. It’s hard to say what that means for the cause, but some professors said they are still dedicated to the union’s mission, no matter what color they are wearing.

The few who showed up wearing “Red for Ed” wore their passion on a sleeve.

“I’m always going to support public education and teachers, so I’ll always do what I can,” said Kim Buikema, a professor in the media department. Coming from the UK, Buikema is new to the culture of May Day, yet she holds the concept of this day in high regards.

Though the color for May Day drew concern, Buikema was one of few who participated in “Red for Ed” to show off her affection for education.

“I got into it three or four years ago. I mainly found out about it because I traveled to England and some of the locals told me about it,” said Nesha Bastien, a Hunter College assistant.

Unfortunately, Bastien was part of many who didn’t wear red, but adopting the culture as her own is the true spirit of May Day.

May Day allows for department heads to hold onto their pride as staff as they continue to fight for new contracts. Inspired by the Union, faculty wear red to symbolize resistance from exploitation and injustice.

“I haven’t done much for May Day, but I want to support the Union,” Ronnie Ancona, Professor of Classics.

The first of May was scheduled to be a day of unity for the faculty at Hunter College. In the spirit of May Day, traditionally the day to celebrate workers, professors were asked to wear “Red for Ed.”  However this year’s showing was weak, and it was hard to spot any faculty members showing up to work in red.

May Day is an official holiday located in sixty-six countries, but it’s occasionally recognized in the United States, where it began. Dwight D. Eisenhower declared May 1 to be “Law Day” in 1958  to celebrate the place of law in the creation of the U.S. In addition the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions proclaimed that eight hour shifts shall constitute a legal day’s labor starting on May 1, 1886.

Around Hunter, it was hard to spot a member of the faculty in red. After walking through the hallways and the buildings several times. It’s hard to say what that means for the cause, but some professors said they are still dedicated to the union’s mission, no matter what color they are wearing.

The few who showed up wearing “Red for Ed” wore their passion on a sleeve.

“I’m always going to support public education and teachers, so I’ll always do what I can,” said Kim Buikema, a professor in the media department. Coming from the UK, Buikema is new to the culture of May Day, yet she holds the concept of this day in high regards.

Though the color for May Day drew concern, Buikema was one of few who participated in “Red for Ed” to show off her affection for education.

“I got into it three or four years ago. I mainly found out about it because I traveled to England and some of the locals told me about it,” said Nesha Bastien, a Hunter College assistant.

Unfortunately, Bastien was part of many who didn’t wear red, but adopting the culture as her own is the true spirit of May Day.

May Day allows for department heads to hold onto their pride as staff as they continue to fight for new contracts. Inspired by the Union, faculty wear red to symbolize resistance from exploitation and injustice.

“I haven’t done much for May Day, but I want to support the Union,” Ronnie Ancona, Professor of Classics.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*